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Word of the Day
Saturday, April 14, 2018

Definitions for carking

  1. Archaic. distressful.

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Citations for carking
Laranger's answering smile showed no trace of the carking anxiety and deadly uncertainty which filled him at the thought of the future. Joseph B. Ames, "The Secret of Spirit Lake," Boys' Life, September 1927
If we get our victuals daily we can lift our voices gaily / In a song that chants farewell to carking care. Anonymous, "Cheer Up," The Rotarian, June 1920
Origin of carking
1300-1350
Carking derives from Norman French carquier “to load, burden,” from Late Latin carcāre, carricāre “to load.” In Old French, i.e., Parisian French, the dialect spoken in the île de France (the region of France that includes Paris), Late Latin carcāre becomes chargier (which becomes charge in English). Norman French does not palatalize c (representing the sound k) before a, which Old French does; thus in English we have the doublets cattle (from Norman French) and chattel from Parisian French. Late Latin carcāre becomes cargar “to load” in Spanish, the source of English cargo. Carking entered English in the early 14th century.
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