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Word of the Day
Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Definitions for magisterial

  1. authoritative; weighty; of importance or consequence; of, relating to, or befitting a master: a magisterial pronouncement by the director of the board.
  2. imperious; domineering: a magisterial tone of command.
  3. of or befitting a magistrate or the office of a magistrate: The judge spoke with magisterial gravity.

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Citations for magisterial
This is an impressive, magisterial book whose steady, earnest gaze also encompasses the lives of pickpockets and poets. Robert McCrum, "Nightwalking review – an enthralling study of London after dark," Guardian, March 29, 2015
They heard a magisterial speech from A. Lawrence Lowell: "As wave after wave rolls landward from the ocean, breaks and fades away sighing down the shingle of the beach, so the generations of men follow one another, sometimes quietly, sometimes, after a storm, with noisy turbulence." William Martin, Harvard Yard, 2003
Origin of magisterial
1625-1635
Magisterial comes directly from Late Latin magisteriālis “pertaining to a teacher or magistrate,” a development of Latin magistrālis, a derivative of Latin magister “magistrate, master, teacher.” Magister is formed from the adverb magis “more” and the Proto-Indo-European suffix -ter, used to form natural or opposing pairs, e.g., dexter “right-hand” and sinister “left-hand,” noster “our” and vester “your,” and magister “master,” literally “the bigger guy,” and minister “servant, assistant,” literally “the smaller guy” (from the adverb minus “less”). Magisterial entered English in the 17th century.