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Word of the Day
Thursday, July 26, 2018

Definitions for isopolity

  1. equal rights of citizenship, as in different communities; mutual political rights.

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Citations for isopolity
Isopolity agreements offered states and their citizens a way to share most fully in each other's judicial systems, political processes, religious and cultural life, without giving up their prized mutual autonomy. Richard Billows, "International Relations," The Cambridge History of Greek and Roman Warfare, Volume I, 2007
In the nineteenth century, the British lawyer and legal theorist A. V. Dicey proposed the creation of a common citizenship, or “isopolity,” between the United States and the United Kingdom. Linda Kinstler, "A New Way for the Wealthy to Shop for Citizenships," The New Yorker, June 11, 2016
Origin of isopolity
1830-1840
The Greek philosopher Aristotle (384-322 b.c.) was the first author to use isopolīteía “equality of civic rights.” Isopolīteía applied to individuals and communities; it also meant reciprocity of such rights between states (as by treaty). Polīteía “citizenship, daily life of a citizen, body of citizens; government, polity, constitution” is a derivative of the noun pólis “citadel (of a city), city, one’s city or country.” Pólis comes the very complicated Proto-Indo-European root pel-, pelǝ-, plē- “citadel, fortified elevation, city.” The same root yields the Sanskrit noun pū́r “citadel, city” (Singapur “Singapore” means “Lion City”), and Lithuanian pilìs “citadel, castle.” Isopolity entered English in the 19th century.