Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

Word of the Day
Saturday, August 11, 2018

Definitions for decorous

  1. characterized by dignified propriety in conduct, manners, appearance, character, etc.

Learn something
new every day


GET OUR


Thank youfor signing up
Get the Word of the Day Email
Citations for decorous
If you think British historical dramas are all decorous whisperings about how one should behave upon meeting the queen, this mini-series is here to prove that notion wrong ... Joanna Scutts, "The Very Real Story Behind A Very English Scandal," Slate, July 4, 2018
The normally decorous Senate has been rocked by heated confrontations this week as fellow Republicans have traded personal and profane insults over how much loyalty to show President Trump. Sean Sullivan and Seung Min Kim, "Animosity in the Senate as GOP trades insults over criticism of Trump," Washington Post, June 14, 2018
Origin of decorous
1655-1665
The English adjective decorous ultimately derives from Latin decōrus “acceptable, fitting, proper.” The adjective decōrus is a derivative of the noun decus (inflectional stem decor-) “esteem, honor.” The Latin words derive from the Proto-Indo-European root dek-, dok- “to accept, take,” from which Latin also derives the verb decēre “to be acceptable, be fitting,” whose present participle stem decent- is the source of English decent. From the root dok- Latin forms the verb docēre “to teach (i.e., to make acceptable, make fitting).” The English derivatives of docēre include doctrine and docent. The same root appears in Greek dokeîn “to expect, suppose, imagine, seem, seem good,” and its derivative nouns dógma “what seems good, opinion, belief,” source of English dogma, and dóxa “expectation, opinion, estimation, repute,” and in the Septuagint and the New Testament, “glory, splendor,” which forms the first element in doxology “hymn of praise.” Decorous entered English in the 17th century.