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affirm

[uh-furm] /əˈfɜrm/
verb (used with object)
1.
to state or assert positively; maintain as true:
to affirm one's loyalty to one's country; He affirmed that all was well.
2.
to confirm or ratify:
The appellate court affirmed the judgment of the lower court.
3.
to assert solemnly:
He affirmed his innocence.
4.
to express agreement with or commitment to; uphold; support:
to affirm human rights.
verb (used without object)
5.
Law.
  1. to state something solemnly before a court or magistrate, but without oath.
  2. to ratify and accept a voidable transaction.
  3. (of an appellate court) to determine that the action of the lower court shall stand.
Origin of affirm
1300-1350
1300-50; < Latin affirmāre, equivalent to af- af- + firmāre to make firm (see firm1); replacing Middle English a(f)fermen < Middle French afermer < Latin
Related forms
affirmable, adjective
affirmably, adverb
affirmer, noun
affirmingly, adverb
overaffirm, verb
preaffirm, verb
reaffirm, verb (used with object)
unaffirmed, adjective
Synonyms
1. aver, asseverate, depose, testify. See declare. 2. approve, endorse.
Antonyms
1. deny.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for affirming
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Elinor scoffed the notion; affirming that they would not obtain a morsel of bread to a glass of water, above once in three days.

  • I have no hesitation in affirming that it is a perfect masterpiece in its kind.

    Life and Letters of Lord Macaulay George Otto Trevelyan
  • The present status is somewhat chaotic, some affirming and some denying that arterial changes follow the various methods employed.

    Arteriosclerosis and Hypertension: Louis Marshall Warfield
  • Cedarquist had excused himself, affirming that he must look out for his women folk.

    The Octopus Frank Norris
  • In this state of things, I make no difficulty in affirming that the proposal ought to originate from us.

British Dictionary definitions for affirming

affirm

/əˈfɜːm/
verb (mainly transitive)
1.
(may take a clause as object) to declare to be true; assert positively
2.
to uphold, confirm, or ratify
3.
(intransitive) (law) to make an affirmation
Derived Forms
affirmer, affirmant, noun
Word Origin
C14: via Old French from Latin affirmāre to present (something) as firm or fixed, assert, from ad- to + firmāre to make firm1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for affirming

affirm

v.

c.1300, from Old French afermier (Modern French affirmer) "affirm, confirm; strengthen, consolidate," from Latin affirmare "to make steady, strengthen," figuratively "confirm, corroborate," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + firmare "strengthen, make firm," from firmus "strong" (see firm (adj.)). Spelling refashioned 16c. in French and English on Latin model. Related: Affirmed; affirming.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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