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2017 Word of the Year

anger

[ang-ger] /ˈæŋ gər/
noun
1.
a strong feeling of displeasure and belligerence aroused by a wrong; wrath; ire.
2.
Chiefly British Dialect. pain or smart, as of a sore.
3.
Obsolete. grief; trouble.
verb (used with object)
4.
to arouse anger or wrath in.
5.
Chiefly British Dialect. to cause to smart; inflame.
verb (used without object)
6.
to become angry:
He angers with little provocation.
Origin of anger
1150-1200
1150-1200; Middle English < Scandinavian; compare Old Norse angr sorrow, grief, akin to Old High German angust (German Angst fear), Latin angor anguish
Related forms
angerless, adjective
unangered, adjective
Synonyms
1. resentment, exasperation; choler, bile, spleen. 4. displease, vex, irritate, exasperate, infuriate, enrage, incense, madden.
Synonym Study
1. Anger, fury, indignation, rage imply deep and strong feelings aroused by injury, injustice, wrong, etc. Anger is the general term for a sudden violent displeasure: a burst of anger. Indignation implies deep and justified anger: indignation at cruelty or against corruption. Rage is vehement anger: rage at being frustrated. Fury is rage so great that it resembles insanity: the fury of an outraged lover.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for angered
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Allis's quick eye caught his expression of amused discontent; it angered her.

    Thoroughbreds W. A. Fraser
  • This angered Venus, and she resolved to cast down her earthly rival.

    Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew Josephine Preston Peabody
  • angered at the situation and humiliated by what I had said, I was on the point of leaving at once.

    City of Endless Night Milo Hastings
  • He is a gracious nobleman, and kind of heart, save when he is thwarted or angered.

    Micah Clarke Arthur Conan Doyle
  • It may not be against you, but I know not what else can have angered him.'

    Micah Clarke Arthur Conan Doyle
British Dictionary definitions for angered

anger

/ˈæŋɡə/
noun
1.
a feeling of great annoyance or antagonism as the result of some real or supposed grievance; rage; wrath
verb
2.
(transitive) to make angry; enrage
Word Origin
C12: from Old Norse angr grief; related to Old English enge, Old High German engi narrow, Latin angere to strangle
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for angered

anger

v.

c.1200, "to irritate, annoy, provoke," from Old Norse angra "to grieve, vex, distress; to be vexed at, take offense with," from Proto-Germanic *angus (cf. Old English enge "narrow, painful," Middle Dutch enghe, Gothic aggwus "narrow"), from PIE root *angh- "tight, painfully constricted, painful" (cf. Sanskrit amhu- "narrow," amhah "anguish;" Armenian anjuk "narrow;" Lithuanian ankstas "narrow;" Greek ankhein "to squeeze," ankhone "a strangling;" Latin angere "to throttle, torment;" Old Irish cum-ang "straitness, want"). In Middle English, also of physical pain. Meaning "excite to wrath, make angry" is from late 14c. Related: Angered; angering.

anger

n.

mid-13c., "distress, suffering; anguish, agony," also "hostile attitude, ill will, surliness," from Old Norse angr "distress, grief. sorrow, affliction," from the same root as anger (v.). Sense of "rage, wrath" is early 14c. Old Norse also had angr-gapi "rash, foolish person;" angr-lauss "free from care;" angr-lyndi "sadness, low spirits."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with angered
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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