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blurt

[blurt] /blɜrt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to utter suddenly or inadvertently; divulge impulsively or unadvisedly (usually followed by out):
He blurted out the hiding place of the spy.
noun
2.
an abrupt utterance.
Origin of blurt
1565-1575
First recorded in 1565-75; apparently imitative
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for blurted
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • "Great attractions, no doubt—to me invisible," blurted the major.

    Weighed and Wanting George MacDonald
  • "Here's a letter from me boss, sor," he blurted out, holding it toward me.

    The Underdog F. Hopkinson Smith
  • “A fellow in there is talking about––about Mrs. Maurice,” he blurted.

  • Then, recovering his speech he blurted out that he would not go.

    The Scapegoat Hall Caine
  • Primmie sniffed once more, gulped, and then blurted forth the explanation.

    Galusha the Magnificent Joseph C. Lincoln
British Dictionary definitions for blurted

blurt

/blɜːt/
verb
1.
(transitive) often foll by out. to utter suddenly and involuntarily
Word Origin
C16: probably of imitative origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for blurted

blurt

v.

1570s, probably echoic. Related: blurted; blurting. As a noun, 1570s, probably from the verb.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for blurted

10
13
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