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mitre

[mahy-ter] /ˈmaɪ tər/
noun, verb (used with object), mitred, mitring. Chiefly British.
1.

miter

[mahy-ter] /ˈmaɪ tər/
noun
1.
the official headdress of a bishop in the Western Church, in its modern form a tall cap with a top deeply cleft crosswise, the outline of the front and back resembling that of a pointed arch.
2.
the office or rank of a bishop; bishopric.
3.
Judaism. the official headdress of the ancient high priest, bearing on the front a gold plate engraved with the words Holiness to the Lord. Ex. 28:36–38.
4.
a fillet worn by women of ancient Greece.
5.
Carpentry. an oblique surface formed on a piece of wood or the like so as to butt against an oblique surface on another piece to be joined with it.
6.
Nautical. the inclined seam connecting the two cloths of an angulated sail.
verb (used with object)
7.
to bestow a miter upon, or raise to a rank entitled to it.
8.
to join with a miter joint.
9.
to cut to a miter.
10.
to join (two edges of fabric) at a corner by various methods of folding, cutting, and stitching.
Also, especially British, mitre.
Origin of miter
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English mitre (noun) < Latin mitra < Greek mítra turban, headdress
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for mitred
Historical Examples
  • The principle of halving shown in Figs. 539 and 543, can also be applied to a mitred joint.

    Woodworking for Beginners Charles Gardner Wheeler
  • When all four corners have been mitred, the filling in papers can be pasted in.

  • What have we to do with this mitred prelate—with this crowned king?

    Twice Told Tales Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Fig. 206 is an example of dowelling framing when the moulding on the edge has to be mitred.

    Woodwork Joints William Fairham
  • It depicts the curious device of a mitred prelate holding a sword in his mouth.

  • The side edges of the pieces should be mitred and fitted together.

    The Boy Craftsman A. Neely Hall
  • The upper ends of the rafters are to be mitred, and the V-shaped notch cut as shown in detail drawing.

    Carpentry and Woodwork Edwin W. Foster
  • Luther stands alone before the crowned, the mitred, and the lordly.

    A Lamp to the Path W. K. Tweedie
  • Nail two rafters together at their mitred ends, using ten or twelve penny wire nails.

    Carpentry and Woodwork Edwin W. Foster
  • The reliquary was in the form of a mitred head, after the manner of that of S. Denis.

    The Churches of Paris S. Sophia Beale
British Dictionary definitions for mitred

miter

/ˈmaɪtə/
noun, verb
1.
the usual US spelling of mitre

mitre

/ˈmaɪtə/
noun
1.
(Christianity) the liturgical headdress of a bishop or abbot, in most western churches consisting of a tall pointed cleft cap with two bands hanging down at the back
2.
short for mitre joint
3.
a bevelled surface of a mitre joint
4.
(in sewing) a diagonal join where the hems along two sides meet at a corner of the fabric
verb (transitive)
5.
to make a mitre joint between (two pieces of material, esp wood)
6.
to make a mitre in (a fabric)
7.
to confer a mitre upon: a mitred abbot
Word Origin
C14: from Old French, from Latin mitra, from Greek mitra turban
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for mitred

mitre

n.

bishop's tall hat, late 14c., from Old French mitre, from Latin mitra "headband, turban," from Greek mitra "headband, turban," earlier a belt or cloth worn under armor about the waist, from PIE root *mei- "to tie" (cf. Sanskrit Mitrah, Old Persian Mithra-, god names; Russian mir "world, peace," Greek mitos "a warp thread"). In Latin, "a kind of headdress common among Asiatics, the wearing of which by men was regarded in Rome as a mark of effeminacy" [OED]. But the word was used in Vulgate to translate Hebrew micnepheth "headdress of a priest."

miter

n.

alternative spelling of mitre (see -re).

in the carpentry sense of "joint at a 45 degree angle," 1670s, perhaps from mitre, via notion of joining of the two peaks of the folded cap. As a verb from 1731.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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mitred in the Bible

(Heb. mitsnepheth), something rolled round the head; the turban or head-dress of the high priest (Ex. 28:4, 37, 39; 29:6, etc.). In the Authorized Version of Ezek. 21:26, this Hebrew word is rendered "diadem," but in the Revised Version, "mitre." It was a twisted band of fine linen, 8 yards in length, coiled into the form of a cap, and worn on official occasions (Lev. 8:9; 16:4; Zech. 3:5). On the front of it was a golden plate with the inscription, "Holiness to the Lord." The mitsnepheth differed from the mitre or head-dress (migba'ah) of the common priest. (See BONNET.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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