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mullion

[muhl-yuh n]Architecture
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noun
  1. a vertical member, as of stone or wood, between the lights of a window, the panels in wainscoting, or the like.
  2. one of the radiating bars of a rose window or the like.
verb (used with object)
  1. to furnish with, or to form into divisions by the use of, mullions.

Origin of mullion

First recorded in 1560–70; metathetic variant of monial
Related formsun·mul·lioned, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for mullioned

Historical Examples

  • Over these also are mullioned windows with blank interstices.

    The New Guide to Peterborough Cathedral

    George S. Phillips

  • But these also were mullioned, and the entire frontage of the house was uniform in its style.

  • The mullioned windows were so constructed that no one could enter through them.

  • Beside this archway was a mullioned window with latticed panes.

    Glories of Spain

    Charles W. Wood

  • Here was the open landscape in front of the mullioned windows.

    Hard Pressed

    Fred M. White


British Dictionary definitions for mullioned

mullion

noun
  1. a vertical member between the casements or panes of a window or the panels of a screen
  2. one of the ribs on a rock face
verb
  1. (tr) to furnish (a window, screen, etc) with mullions

Word Origin

C16: variant of Middle English munial, from Old French moinel, of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for mullioned

mullion

n.

"vertical column between the lights of a window," 1560s, metathesis of Middle English moyniel (early 14c.), from Anglo-French moinel, noun use of moienel (adj.) "middle," from Old French meien "intermediate, mean" (see mean (adj.)). Related: Mullioned.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper