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providence

[prov-i-duh ns] /ˈprɒv ɪ dəns/
noun
1.
(often initial capital letter) the foreseeing care and guidance of God or nature over the creatures of the earth.
2.
(initial capital letter) God, especially when conceived as omnisciently directing the universe and the affairs of humankind with wise benevolence.
3.
a manifestation of divine care or direction.
4.
provident or prudent management of resources; prudence.
5.
foresight; provident care.
Origin of providence
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English < Latin prōvidentia foresight, forethought. See provident, -ence

Providence

[prov-i-duh ns] /ˈprɒv ɪ dəns/
noun
1.
a seaport in and the capital of Rhode Island, in the NE part, at the head of Narragansett Bay.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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British Dictionary definitions for providences

providence

/ˈprɒvɪdəns/
noun
1.
  1. (Christianity) God's foreseeing protection and care of his creatures
  2. such protection and care as manifest by some other force
2.
a supposed manifestation of such care and guidance
3.
the foresight or care exercised by a person in the management of his affairs or resources

Providence1

/ˈprɒvɪdəns/
noun
1.
(Christianity) God, esp as showing foreseeing care and protection of his creatures
Word Origin
C14: via French from Latin prōvidēntia, from prōvidēre to provide; see provide, -ence

Providence2

/ˈprɒvɪdəns/
noun
1.
a port in NE Rhode Island, capital of the state, at the head of Narragansett Bay: founded by Roger Williams in 1636. Pop: 176 365 (2003 est)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for providences

providence

n.

late 14c., "foresight, prudent anticipation," from Old French providence "divine providence, foresight" (12c.) and directly from Latin providentia "foresight, precaution, foreknowledge," from providentem (nominative providens), present participle of providere (see provide).

Providence (usually capitalized) "God as beneficent caretaker," first recorded c.1600, from earlier use of the word for "God's beneficient care or guidance" (14c.), short for divine providence, etc. The noun in Latin occasionally had a similar sense.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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providences in Culture

Providence definition


Capital of Rhode Island and the largest city in the state, located in the northeastern part of the state.

Note: Port of entry and major trading center.
Note: Roger Williams founded Providence in the early seventeenth century after he was exiled from the colony of Massachusetts. He named it in gratitude for “God's merciful providence.”
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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providences in the Bible

literally means foresight, but is generally used to denote God's preserving and governing all things by means of second causes (Ps. 18:35; 63:8; Acts 17:28; Col. 1:17; Heb. 1:3). God's providence extends to the natural world (Ps. 104:14; 135:5-7; Acts 14:17), the brute creation (Ps. 104:21-29; Matt. 6:26; 10:29), and the affairs of men (1 Chr. 16:31; Ps. 47:7; Prov. 21:1; Job 12:23; Dan. 2:21; 4:25), and of individuals (1 Sam. 2:6; Ps. 18:30; Luke 1:53; James 4:13-15). It extends also to the free actions of men (Ex. 12:36; 1 Sam. 24:9-15; Ps. 33:14, 15; Prov. 16:1; 19:21; 20:24; 21:1), and things sinful (2 Sam. 16:10; 24:1; Rom. 11:32; Acts 4:27, 28), as well as to their good actions (Phil. 2:13; 4:13; 2 Cor. 12:9, 10; Eph. 2:10; Gal. 5:22-25). As regards sinful actions of men, they are represented as occurring by God's permission (Gen. 45:5; 50:20. Comp. 1 Sam. 6:6; Ex. 7:13; 14:17; Acts 2:3; 3:18; 4:27, 28), and as controlled (Ps. 76:10) and overruled for good (Gen. 50:20; Acts 3:13). God does not cause or approve of sin, but only limits, restrains, overrules it for good. The mode of God's providential government is altogether unexplained. We only know that it is a fact that God does govern all his creatures and all their actions; that this government is universal (Ps. 103:17-19), particular (Matt. 10:29-31), efficacious (Ps. 33:11; Job 23:13), embraces events apparently contingent (Prov. 16:9, 33; 19:21; 21:1), is consistent with his own perfection (2 Tim. 2:13), and to his own glory (Rom. 9:17; 11:36).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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