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redo

[verb ree-doo; noun ree-doo]
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verb (used with object), re·did, re·done, re·do·ing.
  1. to do again; repeat.
  2. to revise or reconstruct: to redo the production schedule.
  3. to redecorate or remodel; renovate: It will cost too much to redo both the kitchen and bathroom.
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noun, plural re·dos, re·do's.
  1. the act or an instance of redoing.
  2. something redone.
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Origin of redo

First recorded in 1590–1600; re- + do1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for redone

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • On this were engaged at first one Lindau and Roche, who shaped it in the rough, but so badly that it had to be redone.

    Wagner as I Knew Him

    Ferdinand Christian Wilhelm Praeger

  • About the way that he was turning out a lot of work, because it had to be redone, therefore wasting company materials.

    Warren Commission (10 of 26): Hearings Vol. X (of 15)

    The President's Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy

  • Already, in 1220, the choir had been redone and two more chapels added, making five apsidioles in all.

    How France Built Her Cathedrals

    Elizabeth Boyle O'Reilly

  • In the necessary changes that followed practically all the central nave was redone by Bishop Guillaume de Passavant (1145-86).

    How France Built Her Cathedrals

    Elizabeth Boyle O'Reilly


British Dictionary definitions for redone

redo

verb -does, -doing, -did or -done (tr)
  1. to do over again
  2. informal to redecorate, esp thoroughlywe redid the house last summer
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for redone

redo

v.

also re-do, 1590s, from re- "back, again" + do (v.). Related: Redone; redoing.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper