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roister

[roi-ster]
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verb (used without object)
  1. to act in a swaggering, boisterous, or uproarious manner.
  2. to revel noisily or without restraint.
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Origin of roister

1545–55; v. use of roister (noun) < Middle French ru(i)stre ruffian, boor, variant of ru(i)ste rustic
Related formsroist·er·er, nounroist·er·ous, adjectiveroist·er·ous·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for roistering

Historical Examples

  • But soon the tide returns, and once more I hear the roistering of the waves.

    Ballads of a Bohemian

    Robert W. Service

  • Me, Morgan la fée, espouse one of these roistering, cursing foreigners?

    Louisiana Lou

    William West Winter

  • But for her these nights would be spent in drinking, roistering, fighting and carousing.

  • But there were sounds of roistering from down the ship's corridor.

  • She had married the 76 roistering blade for his bank account only.

    Carmen Ariza

    Charles Francis Stocking


British Dictionary definitions for roistering

roister

verb (intr)
  1. to engage in noisy merrymaking; revel
  2. to brag, bluster, or swagger
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Derived Formsroisterer, nounroisterous, adjectiveroisterously, adverb

Word Origin

C16: from Old French rustre lout, from ruste uncouth, from Latin rusticus rural; see rustic
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for roistering

roister

v.

"bluster, swagger, be bold, noisy, vaunting, or turbulent," 1580s, from an obsolete noun roister "noisy bully" (1550s, displaced by 19c. by roisterer), from Middle French ruistre "ruffian," from Old French ruiste "boorish, gross, uncouth," from Latin rusticus (see rustic (adj.)). Related: Roistered; roistering. Ralph Royster-Doyster is the title and lead character of what is sometimes called the first English comedy (Udall, 1555).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper