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2017 Word of the Year

saunter

[sawn-ter, sahn-] /ˈsɔn tər, ˈsɑn-/
verb (used without object)
1.
to walk with a leisurely gait; stroll:
sauntering through the woods.
noun
2.
a leisurely walk or ramble; stroll.
3.
a leisurely gait.
Origin of saunter
1660-1670
First recorded in 1660-70; of uncertain origin
Related forms
saunterer, noun
Synonyms
1–3. amble, ramble, meander.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for sauntering
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • They had left the table by now, and were sauntering together on the terrace.

    The Snare Rafael Sabatini
  • sauntering dreamily, she moved away from the ancient derelict.

  • A young Mexican, tired of his work, was sauntering one day on the seashore.

  • But already there is a feeling of sauntering in like an old hand at the game.

    Working With the Working Woman Cornelia Stratton Parker
  • She was sure Hester must be dreadfully tired with sauntering about so long.

    Deerbrook Harriet Martineau
  • They were engaged in gossiping, sauntering about, or comparing their guns and other weapons.

    The Grateful Indian W.H.G. Kingston
  • "It's all right, now," said Craig, sauntering out before the bar.

    The Silent Bullet Arthur B. Reeve
British Dictionary definitions for sauntering

saunter

/ˈsɔːntə/
verb (intransitive)
1.
to walk in a casual manner; stroll
noun
2.
a leisurely pace or stroll
3.
a leisurely old-time dance
Derived Forms
saunterer, noun
Word Origin
C17 (meaning: to wander aimlessly), C15 (to muse): of obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for sauntering

saunter

v.

late 15c., santren "to muse, be in reverie," of uncertain origin despite many absurd speculations. Meaning "walk with a leisurely gait" is from 1660s, and may be a different word. Klein suggests this sense of the word derives via Anglo-French sauntrer (mid-14c.) from French s'aventurer "to take risks," but OED finds this "unlikely." Related: Sauntered; sauntering.

saunter

n.

"a leisurely stroll," 1828, from saunter (v.). Earlier it meant "idle occupation, diversion" (1728).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for sauntering

11
15
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