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scowl

[skoul]
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verb (used without object)
  1. to draw down or contract the brows in a sullen, displeased, or angry manner.
  2. to have a gloomy or threatening look.
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verb (used with object)
  1. to affect or express with a scowl.
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noun
  1. a scowling expression, look, or aspect.
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Origin of scowl

1300–50; Middle English scoulen (v.); perhaps < Scandinavian; compare Danish skule to scowl, Norwegian skule to look furtively, though these may be < Low German schūlen to spy
Related formsscowl·er, nounscowl·ful, adjectivescowl·ing·ly, adverbun·scowl·ing, adjectiveun·scowl·ing·ly, adverb

Synonyms

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1. frown, lower, glare. 2. glower, gloom.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for scowled

Historical Examples

  • He scowled upon me with a natural hate, and refused to comply with my request.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327

    Various

  • He blinked and scowled in the sunshine, because his eyes were not used to the light.

  • He scowled over it, then considered the other side of the face.

    The Black Bag

    Louis Joseph Vance

  • They scowled at him as if they were mad enough to bite off the heads of tenpenny nails.

    Welsh Fairy Tales

    William Elliott Griffis

  • Good Indian looked straight past the girl, and scowled at Pete.

    Good Indian

    B. M. Bower


British Dictionary definitions for scowled

scowl

verb
  1. (intr) to contract the brows in a threatening or angry manner
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noun
  1. a gloomy or threatening expression
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Word Origin

C14: probably from Scandinavian; compare Danish skule to look down, Old English scūlēgede squint-eyed
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for scowled

scowl

v.

mid-14c., from a Scandinavian source (cf. Norwegian skule "look furtively, squint, look embarrassed," Danish skule "to scowl, cast down the eyes"). Probably related to Old English sceolh "wry, oblique," Old High German scelah "curved," German scheel "squint-eyed;" from PIE root *sqel- "crooked, curved, bent." Related: Scowled; scowling.

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scowl

n.

c.1500, from scowl (v.).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper