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shirr

[shur]
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verb (used with object)
  1. to draw up or gather (cloth or the like) on three or more parallel threads.
  2. to bake (eggs removed from the shell) in a shallow dish or in individual dishes.
noun
  1. Also shirr·ing. a shirred arrangement, as of cloth.

Origin of shirr

First recorded in 1840–50; origin uncertain
Related formsun·shirred, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for shirring

Historical Examples

  • There was not the slightest doubt that all its shirring was of real, real silk!

    In Old Kentucky

    Edward Marshall and Charles T. Dazey

  • Machine work: Plain stitching, tucking, shirring, bias strips stitched on material.

    The Making of a Trade School

    Mary Schenck Woolman

  • Long elbow cuffs, and above them two beautiful puffs divided by rows of shirring and bows of brown silk ribbon.

  • The shirring string under the crown is pulled up first and the material over-handed to the frame.

  • Long elbow cuffs, and above them two beautiful puffs divided by rows of shirring and bows of brown-silk ribbon.

    Anne Of Green Gables

    Lucy Maud Montgomery


British Dictionary definitions for shirring

shirr

verb
  1. to gather (fabric) into two or more parallel rows to decorate a dress, blouse, etc, often using elastic thread
  2. (tr) to bake (eggs) out of their shells
noun Also: shirring
  1. a series of gathered rows decorating a dress, blouse, etc

Word Origin

C19: of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for shirring

shirr

v.

"to gather (cloth) on parallel threads," 1860 (implied in shirring), back-formation from shirred (1847), from shirr (n.) "elastic webbing," of unknown origin.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper