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sufficient

[suh-fish-uh nt]
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adjective
  1. adequate for the purpose; enough: sufficient proof; sufficient protection.
  2. Logic. (of a condition) such that its existence leads to the occurrence of a given event or the existence of a given thing.Compare necessary(def 4c).
  3. Archaic. competent.
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Origin of sufficient

1350–1400; Middle English < Latin sufficient- (stem of sufficiēns), present participle of sufficere to suffice, equivalent to suf- suf- + -fici-, present stem of -ficere, combining form of facere to make, do1 + -ent- -ent
Related formssuf·fi·cient·ly, adverbo·ver·suf·fi·cient, adjectiveo·ver·suf·fi·cient·ly, adverbpre·suf·fi·cient, adjectivepre·suf·fi·cient·ly, adverbqua·si-suf·fi·cient, adjectivequa·si-suf·fi·cient·ly, adverbsu·per·suf·fi·cient, adjectivesu·per·suf·fi·cient·ly, adverb

Antonyms

1. meager, scant, inadequate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

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British Dictionary definitions for sufficiently

sufficient

adjective
  1. enough to meet a need or purpose; adequate
  2. logic (of a condition) assuring the truth of a statement; requiring but not necessarily required by some other state of affairsCompare necessary (def. 3e)
  3. archaic competent; capable
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noun
  1. a sufficient quantity
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Derived Formssufficiently, adverb

Word Origin

C14: from Latin sufficiens supplying the needs of, from sufficere to suffice
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for sufficiently

adv.

late 14c., from sufficient + -ly (2).

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sufficient

adj.

early 14c., from Old French sufficient, from Latin sufficiens, present participle of sufficere (see suffice).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper