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syntactic

[sin-tak-tik] /sɪnˈtæk tɪk/
adjective
1.
of or relating to syntax: syntactic errors in English;
the syntactic rules for computer source code.
2.
consisting of or noting morphemes that are combined in the same order as they would be if they were separate words in a corresponding construction:
The word blackberry, which consists of an adjective followed by a noun, is a syntactic compound.
Also, syntactical.
Origin of syntactic
1570-1580
1570-80; < New Latin syntacticus < Greek syntaktikós, equivalent to syntakt(ós) ordered, arranged together, verbid of syntássein to arrange together (syn- syn- + tag-, base of tássein to arrange + -tos adj. suffix) + -ikos -ic; see tactic
Related forms
syntactically, adverb
nonsyntactic, adjective
nonsyntactical, adjective
nonsyntactically, adverb
unsyntactic, adjective
unsyntactical, adjective
unsyntactically, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for syntactical
Historical Examples
  • "Parole in libert," words free from syntactical shackles are the words with which we shall fight the battle of the future.

    Idling in Italy Joseph Collins
  • The cause of this variation in the force of the two beats is to be sought in the laws of the syntactical accent.

  • The instrumental, locative and dative are mixed in one case, partly for phonetic, partly for syntactical reasons.

  • It coincides less closely than the cesura with syntactical and rhetorical pauses.

    English Verse Raymond MacDonald Alden, Ph.D.
  • Less generally, the rhetorical or syntactical accent in the same way takes precedence of the metrical.

    English Verse Raymond MacDonald Alden, Ph.D.
  • As is often true of cant, we have here simply a syntactical arrangement of words signifying—nothing.

    The Verbalist Thomas Embly Osmun, (AKA Alfred Ayres)
  • The reasons for syntactical usages are given, instead of mere statements that such usages exist.

    A Complete Grammar of Esperanto Ivy Kellerman Reed
British Dictionary definitions for syntactical

syntactic

/sɪnˈtæktɪk/
adjective
1.
Also synˈtactical. relating to or determined by syntax
2.
(logic, linguistics) describable wholly with respect to the grammatical structure of an expression or the rules of well-formedness of a formal system
Derived Forms
syntactically, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for syntactical
adj.

1570s, from Modern Latin syntacticus, from syntaxis (see syntax). Related: Syntactically.

syntactic

adj.

1807, from Modern Latin syntacticus, from Greek syntaktikos, from syntassein (see syntax).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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