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ventilate

[ven-tl-eyt] /ˈvɛn tlˌeɪt/
verb (used with object), ventilated, ventilating.
1.
to provide (a room, mine, etc.) with fresh air in place of air that has been used or contaminated.
2.
Medicine/Medical.
  1. to oxygenate (blood) by exposure to air in the lungs or gills.
  2. to assist the breathing of (a person), as with a respirator.
3.
(of air or wind) to circulate through or blow on, so as to cool or freshen the air of:
Cool breezes ventilated the house.
4.
to expose to the action of air or wind:
to ventilate floor timbers.
5.
to submit (a question, problem, etc.) to open, full examination and discussion.
6.
to give utterance or expression to (an opinion, complaint, etc.).
7.
to furnish with a vent or opening, as for the escape of air or gas.
verb (used without object), ventilated, ventilating.
8.
to give utterance or expression to one's emotions, opinions, complaints, etc.
Origin of ventilate
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English ventilatten to blow (something) away < Latin ventilātus (past participle of ventilāre to fan), equivalent to vent(us) wind1 + -il- v. suffix (variant of -ul-, orig. after derivatives of nouns ending in -ulus -ule; cf. speculate) + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
ventilable, adjective
overventilate, verb (used with object), overventilated, overventilating.
reventilate, verb (used with object), reventilated, reventilating.
self-ventilated, adjective
underventilate, verb (used with object), underventilated, underventilating.
underventilated, adjective
unventilated, adjective
well-ventilated, adjective
Synonyms
5. broadcast, publicize, circulate, report.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for well-ventilated
Historical Examples
  • The patient should go to bed in a large, well-ventilated, and sunny room.

  • The patient should sleep on a mattress in a well-ventilated room.

  • There is little or no objection to doing the ironing in a well-ventilated kitchen.

    Convenient Houses

    Louis Henry Gibson
  • Is the building in which he studies clean, well-ventilated, and sanitary?

    The Complete Club Book for Women Caroline French Benton
  • The prisoners were placed in apartments large and well-ventilated.

    Joseph Bonaparte John S. C. Abbott
  • As some chlorine is given off it is best to use this in a well-ventilated place.

  • They had their room—bare, dirty and well-ventilated—for next to nothing.

    The Sorcery Club

    Elliott O'Donnell
  • There was a very big and well-ventilated hall and in this we decided to sleep.

  • Just then a boy, in well-ventilated garments and a rimless straw hat, with a blacking box over his shoulder, approached.

    Brave and Bold Horatio Alger
  • Then he showed Andy his own sleeping quarters, a quite comfortable, well-ventilated room, and set up an extra cot in it.

    Airship Andy Frank V. Webster
British Dictionary definitions for well-ventilated

ventilate

/ˈvɛntɪˌleɪt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to drive foul air out of (an enclosed area)
2.
to provide with a means of airing
3.
to expose (a question, grievance, etc) to public examination or discussion
4.
(physiol) to oxygenate (the blood) in the capillaries of the lungs
5.
to winnow (grain)
Derived Forms
ventilable, adjective
Word Origin
C15: from Latin ventilāre to fan, from ventulus diminutive of ventus wind
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for well-ventilated

ventilate

v.

mid-15c., "to blow away something" (of wind), from Latin ventilatus, past participle of ventilare "to brandish, toss in the air, winnow, fan, agitate, set in motion," from ventulus "a breeze," diminutive of ventus "wind" (see wind (n.1)). Original notion is of cleaning grain by tossing it in the air and letting the wind blow away the chaff. Meaning "supply a room with fresh air" first recorded 1660s (implied in ventilation). Slang sense of "shoot" (someone) is recorded from 1875. Related: Ventilated; ventilating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for well-ventilated

ventilate

verb

To shoot; plug

[1875+; fr the notion of letting air into someone]

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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