admit

[ad-mit]

verb (used with object), ad·mit·ted, ad·mit·ting.

verb (used without object), ad·mit·ted, ad·mit·ting.

to permit entrance; give access: This door admits to the garden.
to permit the possibility of something; allow (usually followed by of): The contract admits of no other interpretation.

Origin of admit

1375–1425; < Latin admittere, equivalent to ad- ad- + mittere to send, let go; replacing late Middle English amitte, with a- a-5 (instead of ad-) < Middle French amettre < Latin, as above
Related formsad·mit·ta·ble, ad·mit·ti·ble, adjectivead·mit·ter, nounhalf-ad·mit·ted, adjectivehalf-ad·mit·ted·ly, adverbnon·ad·mit·ted, adjective, nounnon·ad·mit·ted·ly, adverbpre·ad·mit, verb (used with object), pre·ad·mit·ted, pre·ad·mit·ting.re·ad·mit, verb, re·ad·mit·ted, re·ad·mit·ting.un·ad·mit·ted, adjectiveun·ad·mit·ted·ly, adverbwell-ad·mit·ted, adjective

Synonyms for admit

1. receive. 6. own, avow.

Synonym study

6. See acknowledge.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for admitted

Contemporary Examples of admitted

Historical Examples of admitted

  • He made his way to the house of Squire Paine, and, after a brief pause, was admitted.

    Brave and Bold

    Horatio Alger

  • She had left it impulsively, she admitted, scarce knowing what she did.

    Malbone

    Thomas Wentworth Higginson

  • "He did seem rather cut up about the stables," Austin admitted.

    Viviette

    William J. Locke

  • The constituencies; and into these constituencies had been admitted the Jews.

    The Grand Old Man

    Richard B. Cook

  • But a sense in which God is "unknowable" to us has to be admitted.


British Dictionary definitions for admitted

admit

verb -mits, -mitting or -mitted (mainly tr)

(may take a clause as object) to confess or acknowledge (a crime, mistake, etc)
(may take a clause as object) to concede (the truth or validity of something)
to allow to enter; let in
(foll by to) to allow participation (in) or the right to be part (of)to admit to the profession
(when intr, foll by of) to allow (of); leave room (for)
(intr) to give accessthe door admits onto the lawn

Word Origin for admit

C14: from Latin admittere to let come or go to, from ad- to + mittere to send
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for admitted

admit

v.

late 14c., "let in," from Latin admittere "to allow to enter, let in, let come, give access," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Sense of "to concede as valid or true" is first recorded early 15c. Related: Admitted; Admitting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper