adventurous

[ad-ven-cher-uhs]

Origin of adventurous

1300–50; Middle English < Middle French
Related formsad·ven·tur·ous·ly, adverbad·ven·tur·ous·ness, nounnon·ad·ven·tur·ous, adjectivenon·ad·ven·tur·ous·ly, adverbnon·ad·ven·tur·ous·ness, nounun·ad·ven·tur·ous, adjectiveun·ad·ven·tur·ous·ly, adverbun·ad·ven·tur·ous·ness, noun

Synonyms for adventurous

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for adventurously

Contemporary Examples of adventurously

Historical Examples of adventurously

  • On the contrary, I run my head into each danger most adventurously.

  • For he was adventurously happy in his propinquity to that simple and sincere creature.

    The Regent

    E. Arnold Bennett

  • "We'll risk it," John declared, adventurously; and the children echoed his enthusiasm with joy.

    Poor Relations

    Compton Mackenzie

  • He still wanted her adventurously, but her adventure was not the adventure of siege and capture but of peaceful holding.

    Joanna Godden

    Sheila Kaye-Smith

  • True type of the British sailor, he had the physique of a strong man and the adventurously cheerful expression of a boy.


British Dictionary definitions for adventurously

adventurous

adjective
  1. Also: adventuresome daring or enterprising
  2. dangerous; involving risk
Derived Formsadventurously, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for adventurously

adventurous

adj.

mid-14c., "hazardous" (also "occurring by chance," late 14c.), from Old French aventuros "chance, accidental, fortuitous;" of persons, "devoted to adventure" (Modern French aventureux), from aventure (see adventure (n.)). Sense evolution is through "rash, risk-taking" (c.1400), "daring, fond of adventure" (mid-15c.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper