ankus

[ ang-kuhs, uhng-kuhsh ]

noun,plural an·kus, an·kus·es.
  1. an elephant goad of India with a spike and a hook at one end.

Origin of ankus

1
1885–90; <Hindi; akin to angle2

Words Nearby ankus

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2024

How to use ankus in a sentence

  • This time I had my ankus with me, so that in case he should run away again I could prick his neck and make him behave.

    Kari the Elephant | Dhan Gopal Mukerji
  • If thou wilt give me the ankus to take away, it is good hunting.

    The Second Jungle Book | Rudyard Kipling
  • On he came, amid a rising roar of approval, Speed in gorgeous robes perched on high, 295 ankus raised.

    The Maids of Paradise | Robert W. (Robert William) Chambers
  • It was a three-foot ankus, or elephant-goad—something like a small boat-hook.

    The Second Jungle Book | Rudyard Kipling
  • Close to the fire, and blazing in the sunshine, lay the ruby-and-turquoise ankus.

    The Second Jungle Book | Rudyard Kipling

British Dictionary definitions for ankus

ankus

/ (ˈæŋkəs) /


nounplural -kus or -kuses
  1. a stick used, esp in India, for goading elephants

Origin of ankus

1
from Hindi

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012