nonplus

[non-pluhs, non-pluhs]
See more synonyms for nonplus on Thesaurus.com
verb (used with object), non·plussed or non·plused, non·plus·sing or non·plus·ing.
  1. to render utterly perplexed; puzzle completely.
noun
  1. a state of utter perplexity.

Origin of nonplus

1575–85; (noun) < Latin nōn plūs literally, not more, no further, i.e., a state in which nothing more can be done

Synonyms for nonplus

See more synonyms for on Thesaurus.com
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for nonplussed

Contemporary Examples of nonplussed

Historical Examples of nonplussed

  • The captain, nonplussed, looked at Marius, and Florimond surprised the look.

    St. Martin's Summer

    Rafael Sabatini

  • They were nonplussed, but their boss had not lost his nerve.

    Whispering Smith

    Frank H. Spearman

  • He looked at Druel with such composure that the latter for a moment was nonplussed.

    Nan of Music Mountain

    Frank H. Spearman

  • This nonplussed the fanatic, who had come possibly with an eye to business.

  • For the moment Livingston was nonplussed, and declined to make any offer.

    Union and Democracy

    Allen Johnson


British Dictionary definitions for nonplussed

nonplus

verb -plusses, -plussing or -plussed or US -pluses, -plusing or -plused
  1. (tr) to put at a loss; confoundhe was nonplussed by the sudden announcement
noun plural -pluses
  1. a state of utter perplexity prohibiting action or speech

Word Origin for nonplus

C16: from Latin nōn plūs no further (that is, nothing further can be said or done)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for nonplussed
adj.

c.1600, past participle adjective from nonplus.

nonplus

v.

"to bring to a nonplus, to perplex," 1590s, from the noun (1580s), properly "state where 'nothing more' can be done or said," from Latin non plus "no more, no further" (see plus). Related: Nonplussed.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper