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nonplus

[non-pluhs, non-pluhs]
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verb (used with object), non·plussed or non·plused, non·plus·sing or non·plus·ing.
  1. to render utterly perplexed; puzzle completely.
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noun
  1. a state of utter perplexity.
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Origin of nonplus

1575–85; (noun) < Latin nōn plūs literally, not more, no further, i.e., a state in which nothing more can be done

Synonyms

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1. perplex, confuse, confound, disconcert.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for nonplus

Historical Examples

  • Peter was puzzled, and scratched his ear like a man at a nonplus.

    The Daltons, Volume II (of II)

    Charles James Lever

  • They were put to a nonplus, and summoned the Devil to their relief.

  • The inquiring mind is at a nonplus, and is likely to remain so.

  • This reply seemed to nonplus us all with the exception of Maitland and Godin.

    The Darrow Enigma

    Melvin L. Severy

  • Wingate was now at a nonplus, and “could not well tell what to say.”


British Dictionary definitions for nonplus

nonplus

verb -plusses, -plussing or -plussed or US -pluses, -plusing or -plused
  1. (tr) to put at a loss; confoundhe was nonplussed by the sudden announcement
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noun plural -pluses
  1. a state of utter perplexity prohibiting action or speech
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Word Origin

C16: from Latin nōn plūs no further (that is, nothing further can be said or done)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for nonplus

v.

"to bring to a nonplus, to perplex," 1590s, from the noun (1580s), properly "state where 'nothing more' can be done or said," from Latin non plus "no more, no further" (see plus). Related: Nonplussed.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper