annoyed

[uh-noid]

adjective

irritated, disturbed, or bothered: I was quite annoyed by the time he arrived, over an hour late.

Nearby words

  1. announce,
  2. announcement,
  3. announcer,
  4. annoy,
  5. annoyance,
  6. annoying,
  7. annual,
  8. annual general meeting,
  9. annual parallax,
  10. annual percentage rate

Origin of annoyed


annoy

[uh-noi]

verb (used with object)

to disturb or bother (a person) in a way that displeases, troubles, or slightly irritates.
to molest; harm.

verb (used without object)

to be bothersome or troublesome.

noun

Archaic. an annoyance.

Origin of annoy

1250–1300; (v.) Middle English an(n)oien, enoien < Anglo-French, Old French anoier, anuier to molest, harm, tire < Late Latin inodiāre to cause aversion, from Latin phrase mihi in odiō est … I dislike …; cf. in-2, odium, ennui, noisome; (noun) Middle English a(n)noi, ennoi < Anglo-French, Old French a(n)nui, etc., derivative of the v.

Related formsan·noy·er, nounhalf-an·noyed, adjectiveun·an·noyed, adjective

Can be confusedaggravate annoy irritate

Synonym study

1. See bother, worry.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for annoyed


British Dictionary definitions for annoyed

annoy

verb

to irritate or displease
to harass with repeated attacks
Derived Formsannoyer, noun

Word Origin for annoy

C13: from Old French anoier, from Late Latin inodiāre to make hateful, from Latin in odiō (esse) (to be) hated, from odium hatred

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for annoyed
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper