apparel

[uh-par-uhl]

noun

verb (used with object), ap·par·eled, ap·par·el·ing or (especially British) ap·par·elled, ap·par·el·ling.


Origin of apparel

1200–50; Middle English appareillen < Old French apareillier to make fit, fit out < Vulgar Latin *appariculāre, equivalent to ap- ap-1 + *paricul(us) a fit (see par1 -cule1) + -ā- thematic vowel + -re infinitive suffix
Related formso·ver·ap·par·eled, adjectiveun·ap·par·eled, adjectivewell-ap·par·eled, adjectivewell-ap·par·elled, adjective

Synonyms for apparel

1. clothes, dress, garb, costume, habiliments, vesture. 6. outfit, array, deck out.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for apparelled

Historical Examples of apparelled


British Dictionary definitions for apparelled

apparel

noun

something that covers or adorns, esp outer garments or clothing
nautical a vessel's gear and equipment

verb -els, -elling or -elled or US -els, -eling or -eled

archaic (tr) to clothe, adorn, etc

Word Origin for apparel

C13: from Old French apareillier to make ready, from Vulgar Latin appariculāre (unattested), from Latin apparāre, from parāre to prepare
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for apparelled

apparel

v.

mid-13c., "to equip (in any way)," from Old French apareillier (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *appariculare. This is either from Latin apparare "prepare, make ready" (see apparatus), or from Vulgar Latin *ad-particulare "to put things together." The meaning "to attire in proper clothing" is from mid-14c. Cognate with Italian aparecchiare, Spanish aparejar, Portuguese aparelhar. Related: Appareled; apparelled; appareling; apparelling.

apparel

n.

"personal outfit or attire," early 14c., also "ship's rigging," from Old French apareil "preparation," from apareillier (see apparel (v.)). Earlier in same sense was apparelment (early 14c.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper