arbour

[ ahr-ber ]
/ ˈɑr bər /

noun Chiefly British.

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decorum

Definition for arbour (2 of 2)

arbor1
[ ahr-ber ]
/ ˈɑr bər /

noun

a leafy, shady recess formed by tree branches, shrubs, etc.
a latticework bower intertwined with climbing vines and flowers.
Obsolete. a grass plot; lawn; garden; orchard.
Also especially British, ar·bour.

Origin of arbor

1
1350–1400; Middle English (h)erber < Anglo-French, Old French (h)erbier herbarium; respelling with -or under the influence of arbor3
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for arbour

British Dictionary definitions for arbour (1 of 3)

arbour
/ (ˈɑːbə) /

noun

a leafy glade or bower shaded by trees, vines, shrubs, etc, esp when trained about a trellis
obsolete an orchard, garden, or lawn

Word Origin for arbour

C14 erber, from Old French herbier, from Latin herba grass

British Dictionary definitions for arbour (2 of 3)

arbor1
/ (ˈɑːbə) /

noun

the US spelling of arbour

British Dictionary definitions for arbour (3 of 3)

arbor2
/ (ˈɑːbə) /

noun

a rotating shaft in a machine or power tool on which a milling cutter or grinding wheel is fitted
a rotating shaft or mandrel on which a workpiece is fitted for machining
metallurgy a part, piece, or structure used to reinforce the core of a mould

Word Origin for arbor

C17: from Latin: tree, mast
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for arbour

arbor
[ ärbər ]

n. pl. ar•bo•res (ärbə-rēz′)

A treelike anatomical structure.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.