get-out

[get-out]
noun
  1. Commerce. the break-even point.
  2. Chiefly British. a method or maneuver used to escape a difficult or embarrassing situation; cop-out: The scoundrel has used that get-out once too often.
Idioms
  1. as all get-out, Informal. in the extreme; to the utmost degree: Once his mind is made up, he can be stubborn as all get-out.

Origin of get-out

First recorded in 1880–85; noun use of verb phrase get out
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Word Origin and History for as all getout

get-out

to indicate a high degree of something, attested from 1838.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with as all getout

as all getout

To the ultimate degree, as in She made him furious as all getout. The American writer Joseph C. Neal had it in his Character Sketches (1838): “We look as elegant and as beautiful as get out.” Today it always includes all. [Colloquial; first half of 1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.