at about


At approximately, as in We'll start at about nine. This phrase, most often used with respect to time (as at about four o'clock), is sometimes criticized for being redundant. Although one of the two words sometimes can be omitted without changing the meaning—for example, About four o'clock is when most guests will arrive—in other instances both are needed, as in This stock is now selling at about its original offering price. [Early 1800s]

QUIZZES

TAKE ROUND 2 OF OUR PSAT VOCABULARY QUIZ!

Here is our second set of teacher-selected PSAT vocabulary words. Do you know the meanings of these terms?
Question 1 of 10
advocate
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.