Baldwin

[bawld-win]
|

noun


Baldwin I

noun

1058–1118, king of Jerusalem 1100–18: fought in the first crusade.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for baldwin

Contemporary Examples of baldwin

Historical Examples of baldwin

  • A glimpse at this might have disillusioned Baldwin of his belief that, near to Stuart in years, he was also near in understanding.

    Twos and Threes

    G. B. Stern

  • "There's bound to be some good ones in every bunch," returned Mr. Baldwin.

    When A Man's A Man

    Harold Bell Wright

  • “Well—yes, I have set my heart upon something of that sort, Baldwin,” answered the youth.

    Under the Waves

    R M Ballantyne

  • Hence some years ago Mr. Baldwin planned to erect a new hotel near the site of the old one.

    The Lake of the Sky

    George Wharton James

  • The telephone-bell was ringing, and Baldwin twisted his chair to bring himself within reach of the desk set.

    The Real Man

    Francis Lynde



British Dictionary definitions for baldwin

Baldwin

noun

James Arthur . 1924–87, US Black writer, whose works include the novel Go Tell it on the Mountain (1954)
Stanley, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley. 1867–1947, British Conservative statesman: prime minister (1923–24, 1924–29, 1935–37)

Baldwin I

noun

1058–1118, crusader and first king of Jerusalem (1100–18), who captured Acre (1104), Beirut (1109), and Sidon (1110)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for baldwin

Baldwin

masc. proper name, from Old French Baldoin (Modern French Baudouin), from a Germanic source, cf. Old High German Baldawin, literally "bold friend," from bald "bold" (see bold) + wini "friend" (see win). A popular Flemish name, common in England before and after the Conquest.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper