barf

[bahrf]
See more synonyms for barf on Thesaurus.com

Origin of barf

First recorded in 1955–60; expressive word of uncertain origin
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for barf

Historical Examples of barf

  • "I ain't had a barf since Gravesend," said Dickie, and flushed at the indiscretion.

    Harding's luck

    E. [Edith] Nesbit

  • Barf Latrigg was sixty then, turning a bit gray, but able to shear with any man they could put against him.

    The Squire of Sandal-Side

    Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

  • Yes, yes; Barf is as happy as a boy now, but I remember when he was back-set and fore-set with trouble.

    The Squire of Sandal-Side

    Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

  • Barf's married daughters had their portions long ago, but he left each of them three hundred pounds as a good-will token.

    The Squire of Sandal-Side

    Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

  • Barf had lost his sight when I got there; but he knew my voice, and he asked me to lay my face against his face.

    The Squire of Sandal-Side

    Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr


British Dictionary definitions for barf

barf

verb (tr)
  1. to vomit
noun
  1. the act of vomiting
  2. the matter ejected in vomiting

Word Origin for barf

C20: probably of imitative origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for barf
v.

"to vomit or retch,"1960, American English slang, probably imitative. Related: Barfed; barfing. As a noun, from 1966. Barf bag "air sickness pouch" attested from 1966.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper