barf

[bahrf]

verb, noun Slang.


Origin of barf

First recorded in 1955–60; expressive word of uncertain origin
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for barf

Historical Examples of barf

  • "I ain't had a barf since Gravesend," said Dickie, and flushed at the indiscretion.

    Harding's luck

    E. [Edith] Nesbit

  • Barf Latrigg was sixty then, turning a bit gray, but able to shear with any man they could put against him.

    The Squire of Sandal-Side

    Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

  • Yes, yes; Barf is as happy as a boy now, but I remember when he was back-set and fore-set with trouble.

    The Squire of Sandal-Side

    Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

  • Barf's married daughters had their portions long ago, but he left each of them three hundred pounds as a good-will token.

    The Squire of Sandal-Side

    Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

  • Barf had lost his sight when I got there; but he knew my voice, and he asked me to lay my face against his face.

    The Squire of Sandal-Side

    Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr



British Dictionary definitions for barf

barf

verb (tr)

to vomit

noun

the act of vomiting
the matter ejected in vomiting

Word Origin for barf

C20: probably of imitative origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for barf
v.

"to vomit or retch,"1960, American English slang, probably imitative. Related: Barfed; barfing. As a noun, from 1966. Barf bag "air sickness pouch" attested from 1966.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper