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  • synonyms

basin

[ bey-suh n ]
/ ˈbeɪ sən /
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SEE MORE SYNONYMS FOR basin ON THESAURUS.COM

noun

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RELATED WORDS

pot, bowl, pan, lagoon, valley, pool, watershed, tub, gulf, bay, sag, hollow, ewer, concavity, sink, vessel, hole, sinkhole, dip, depression

Nearby words

basilica, basilican, basilicata, basilisk, basilius, basin, basin range, basinet, basing point, basingstoke, basion

Origin of basin

1175–1225; Middle English bacin < Old French < Late Latin bac(c)īnum (bacc(a) water vessel, back3 + -īnum -ine1); perhaps further related in Latin to beaker
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for basin

British Dictionary definitions for basin

basin

/ (ˈbeɪsən) /

noun

Word Origin for basin

C13: from Old French bacin, from Late Latin bacchīnon, from Vulgar Latin bacca (unattested) container for water; related to Latin bāca berry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for basin

basin


n.

"large shallow vessel or dish," c.1200, from Old French bacin (11c., Modern French bassin), from Vulgar Latin *baccinum, from *bacca "water vessel," perhaps originally Gaulish. Meaning "large-scale artificial water-holding landscape feature" is from 1712. Geological sense of "tract of country drained by one river or draining into one sea" is from 1830.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Science definitions for basin

basin

[ bāsĭn ]

A region drained by a river and its tributaries.
A low-lying area on the Earth's surface in which thick layers of sediment have accumulated. Some basins are bowl-shaped while others are elongate. Basins form through tectonic processes, especially in fault-bordered intermontane areas or in areas where the Earth's crust has warped downwards. They are often a source of valuable oil.
An artificially enclosed area of a river or harbor designed so that the water level remains unaffected by tidal changes.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.