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bastinado

[bas-tuh-ney-doh, -nah-doh]
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noun, plural bas·ti·na·does.
  1. a mode of punishment consisting of blows with a stick on the soles of the feet or on the buttocks.
  2. a blow or a beating with a stick, cudgel, etc.
  3. a stick or cudgel.
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verb (used with object), bas·ti·na·doed, bas·ti·na·do·ing.
  1. to beat with a stick, cane, etc., especially on the soles of the feet or on the buttocks.
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Origin of bastinado

1570–80; earlier bastanado < Spanish bastonada (bastón stick (see baton) + -ada -ade1)
Related formsun·bas·ti·na·doed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for bastinado

Historical Examples

  • Get ye gone, or the bastinado and the bowstring shall be your portion.

    Dreamers of the Ghetto

    I. Zangwill

  • He condemned some to a bastinado, which was inflicted in his presence.

  • "Judge how much your bastinado can affect me," he said, with superb disdain.

  • I did not live to bastinado Krak; nor would I now had I the power.

    The King's Mirror

    Anthony Hope

  • The bastinado was inflicted on both sexes, as with the Jews.


British Dictionary definitions for bastinado

bastinado

noun plural -does
  1. punishment or torture in which the soles of the feet are beaten with a stick
  2. a blow or beating with a stick
  3. a stick; cudgel
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verb -does, -doing or -doed (tr)
  1. to beat (a person) on the soles of the feet
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Word Origin

C16: from Spanish bastonada, from baston stick, from Late Latin bastum see baton
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for bastinado

n.

1570s, from Spanish bastonada "a beating, cudgeling," from baston "stick," from Late Latin bastum (see baton).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper