Beatrice

[bee-uh-tris, bee-tris for 1, 3; bee-a-tris for 2; for 1, 3 also Italian be-ah-tree-che]
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noun

(in Dante's Vita Nuova and Divine Comedy) a symbolic figure developed from the person whom Dante first saw as a child and loved as an ideal of womanhood.
a city in SE Nebraska.
a female given name: from a Latin word meaning “one who brings joy.”

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for beatrice

Contemporary Examples of beatrice

Historical Examples of beatrice

  • Beatrice noted that the brass tubes were all eaten and pitted with verdigris, but they still held firmly.

    Darkness and Dawn

    George Allan England

  • But not a single word did he ever say to Beatrice concerning it or the flint spear-point.

    Darkness and Dawn

    George Allan England

  • Beatrice would be the very person to be carried away by an idea of duty.

    Beatrice

    H. Rider Haggard

  • You might safely assert that to him Beatrice was different from and superior to any other woman you could produce.

    The Gay Adventure

    Richard Bird

  • Had it not been for Beatrice's salary it was difficult to see how the family could have continued to exist.

    Beatrice

    H. Rider Haggard



Word Origin and History for beatrice

Beatrice

fem. proper name, from French Béatrice, from Latin beatrix, fem. of beatricem "who makes happy," from beatus "happy" (see beatitude).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper