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behoove

[ bih-hoov ]
/ bɪˈhuv /
(chiefly in impersonal use)
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verb (used with object), be·hooved, be·hoov·ing.
to be necessary or proper for, as for moral or ethical considerations; be incumbent on: It behooves the court to weigh evidence impartially.
to be worthwhile to, as for personal profit or advantage:It would behoove you to be nicer to those who could help you.
verb (used without object), be·hooved, be·hoov·ing.
Archaic. to be needful, proper, or due: Perseverance is a quality that behooves in a scholar.
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The rainy weather could not ________ my elated spirits on my graduation day.
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Also especially British, be·hove [bih-hohv] /bɪˈhoʊv/ .

Origin of behoove

First recorded before 900; Middle English behoven, Old English behōfian “to need” (behōf behoof + -ian infinitive suffix)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use behoove in a sentence

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