Idioms past bade or (Archaic) bad, past participle bid·den or bid, present participle bid·ding.

    bid fair. fair1(def 29).

Origin of bid

1
before 900; Middle English bidden, Old English biddan to beg, ask; cognate with Old Frisian bidda, Old Saxon biddian, Old High German bittan (German bitten), Old Norse bithja, Gothic bidjan; all < Germanic *bid-ja- (< Indo-European *bhidh-) command, akin to Greek peíthein to persuade, inspire with trust, English bide
Related formsbid·der, noun
Can be confusedbidder bitter

Synonyms for bid

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for bidder

Contemporary Examples of bidder

Historical Examples of bidder

  • As to the farm, then, you are likely to be the only bidder, unless you allow the mortgage to remain.

    The Young Miner

    Horatio Alger, Jr.

  • It would be possible, indeed, for a bidder to take the article from me by force.

  • Unfortunately the official calculator is not of the blood of Bidder.

    France and the Republic

    William Henry Hurlbert

  • And, if glances could have killed, many a bidder would have dropped dead.

    The Crisis, Complete

    Winston Churchill

  • When Dory heard the name of the other bidder, he turned, and saw that it was Pearl Hawlinshed.

    All Adrift

    Oliver Optic


British Dictionary definitions for bidder

bid

verb bids, bidding, bad, bade, esp for senses 1, 2, 5, 7 bid, bidden or esp for senses 1, 2, 5, 7 bid

(often foll by for or against) to offer (an amount) in attempting to buy something, esp in competition with others as at an auction
commerce to respond to an offer by a seller by stating (the more favourable terms) on which one is willing to make a purchase
(tr) to say (a greeting, blessing, etc)to bid farewell
to order; commanddo as you are bid!
(intr usually foll by for) to attempt to attain power, etc
(tr) to invite; ask kindlyshe bade him sit down
bridge to declare in the auction before play how many tricks one expects to make
bid defiance to resist boldly
bid fair to seem probable

noun

  1. an offer of a specified amount, as at an auction
  2. the price offered
commerce
  1. a statement by a buyer, in response to an offer by a seller, of the more favourable terms that would be acceptable
  2. the price or other terms so stated
an attempt, esp an attempt to attain power
bridge
  1. the number of tricks a player undertakes to make
  2. a player's turn to make a bid
short for bid price
See also bid in, bid up
Derived Formsbidder, noun

Word Origin for bid

Old English biddan; related to German bitten
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for bidder

bid

v.

probably a merger of two old words: The sense in bid farewell is from Old English biddan "to ask, entreat, pray, beseech; order; beg" (class V strong verb, past tense bæd, past participle beden), from Proto-Germanic *bidjan "to pray, entreat" (cf. German bitten "to ask," attested from 8c.), which, according to Kluge and Watkins is from a PIE root *gwhedh- "to ask, pray" (see bead (n.)).

To bid at an auction, meanwhile, is from Old English beodan "offer, proclaim" (class II strong verb; past tense bead, p.p. boden), from Proto-Germanic *biudanan "to stretch out, reach out, offer, present," (cf. German bieten "to offer"), from PIE root *bh(e)udh- "to be aware, make aware" (cf. Sanskrit bodhati "is awake, is watchful, observes," buddhah "awakened, enlightened;" Old Church Slavonic bljudo "to observe;" Lithuanian budeti "to be awake;" Old Irish buide "contentment, thanks"). As a noun, 1788, from the verb.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper