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bide

[ bahyd ]
/ baɪd /
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See synonyms for: bide / bid / bode on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), bid·ed or bode; bid·ed or (Archaic) bid; bid·ing.
Archaic. to endure; bear.
Obsolete. to encounter.
verb (used without object), bid·ed or bode; bid·ed or (Archaic) bid; bid·ing.
to dwell; abide; wait; remain.
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Idioms about bide

    bide one's time, to wait for a favorable opportunity: He wanted to ask for a raise, but bided his time.

Origin of bide

before 900; Middle English biden,Old English bīdan; cognate with Old Frisian bīdia,Old Saxon bīdan,Old High German bītan,Old Norse bītha,Gothic beidan,Latin fīdere,Greek peíthesthai to trust, rely <Indo-European *bheidh-; the meaning apparently developed: have trust > endure > wait >abide > remain

OTHER WORDS FROM bide

bider, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use bide in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for bide

bide
/ (baɪd) /

verb bides, biding, bided, bode or bided
(intr) archaic, or dialect to continue in a certain place or state; stay
(intr) archaic, or dialect to live; dwell
(tr) archaic, or dialect to tolerate; endure
bide a wee Scot to stay a little
bide by Scot to abide by
bide one's time to wait patiently for an opportunity
Often shortened to: (Scot) byde

Word Origin for bide

Old English bīdan; related to Old Norse bītha to wait, Gothic beidan, Old High German bītan
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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