abide

[ uh-bahyd ]
/ əˈbaɪd /

verb (used without object), a·bode or a·bid·ed, a·bid·ing.

verb (used with object), a·bode or a·bid·ed, a·bid·ing.

Verb Phrases

abide by,
  1. to act in accord with.
  2. to submit to; agree to: to abide by the court's decision.
  3. to remain steadfast or faithful to; keep: If you make a promise, abide by it.

Origin of abide

before 1000; Middle English abiden, Old English ābīdan; cognate with Old High German irbītan await, Gothic usbeisns expectation, patience. See a-3, bide
Related formsa·bid·er, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for abide

British Dictionary definitions for abide

abide

/ (əˈbaɪd) /

verb abides, abiding, abode or abided

Derived Formsabidance, nounabider, noun

Word Origin for abide

Old English ābīdan, from a- (intensive) + bīdan to wait, bide
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for abide

abide


v.

Old English abidan, gebidan "remain, wait, delay, remain behind," from ge- completive prefix (denoting onward motion; see a- (1)) + bidan "bide, remain, wait, dwell" (see bide). Originally intransitive (with genitive of the object: we abidon his "we waited for him"); transitive sense emerged in Middle English. Meaning "to put up with" (now usually negative) first recorded 1520s. Related: Abided; abiding. The historical conjugation is abide, abode, abidden, but the modern formation is now generally weak.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with abide

abide


In addition to the idioms beginning with abide

  • abide by

also see:

  • can't stand (abide)
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.