building

[ bil-ding ]
/ ˈbɪl dɪŋ /

noun

a relatively permanent enclosed construction over a plot of land, having a roof and usually windows and often more than one level, used for any of a wide variety of activities, as living, entertaining, or manufacturing.
anything built or constructed.
the act, business, or practice of constructing houses, office buildings, etc.

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Origin of building

First recorded in 1250–1300, building is from the Middle English word byldinge.See build, -ing1

synonym study for building

1. Building, edifice, structure refer to something built. Building and structure may apply to either a finished or an unfinished product of construction, and carry no implications as to size or condition. Edifice is a more formal word and narrower in application, referring to a completed structure, and usually a large and imposing one. Building generally connotes a useful purpose (houses, schools, business offices, etc.); structure suggests the planning and constructive process.

OTHER WORDS FROM building

build·ing·less, adjectiveun·der·build·ing, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for building

British Dictionary definitions for building

building
/ (ˈbɪldɪŋ) /

noun

something built with a roof and walls, such as a house or factory
the act, business, occupation, or art of building houses, boats, etc
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012