calumniate

[ kuh-luhm-nee-eyt ]
/ kəˈlʌm niˌeɪt /

verb (used with object), ca·lum·ni·at·ed, ca·lum·ni·at·ing.

to make false and malicious statements about; slander.

Origin of calumniate

1545–55; < Latin calumniātus (past participle of calumniārī to accuse falsely, trick), equivalent to calumni(a) calumny + -ātus -ate1

Related forms

ca·lum·ni·a·tion, nounca·lum·ni·a·tor, nounnon·ca·lum·ni·at·ing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for calumniation

  • But how barbarous that is, and how unfortunate for him, that the world shall think the better of any person for his calumniation!

    Love for Love|William Congreve
  • It was said that he was spoiled by Pitt, and was consumed by vanity, and was broken by Tory calumniation.

  • We are to avoid giving occasion for our enemies to open their mouths in calumniation of God's name and his Word.

  • Thou hast grieved over my calumniation, and likewise hast lamented the damage to my good name.

British Dictionary definitions for calumniation

calumniate

/ (kəˈlʌmnɪˌeɪt) /

verb

(tr) to slander

Derived Forms

calumniable, adjectivecalumniation, nouncalumniator, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012