canter

1
[ kan-ter ]
/ ˈkæn tər /

noun

an easy gallop.

verb (used with or without object)

to move or ride at a canter.

RELATED WORDS

Origin of canter

1
First recorded in 1745–55; short for Canterbury to ride at a pace like that of Canterbury pilgrims

Definition for canter (2 of 4)

canter

2
[ kan-ter ]
/ ˈkæn tər /

noun

a person who is much given to the use of cant.

Origin of canter

2
First recorded in 1870–75; cant1 + -er1

Definition for canter (3 of 4)

Origin of cant

2
1325–75; Middle English: side, border < Anglo-French cant, Old French chant < a Romance base *cantu(m) with the related senses “rim, border” and “angle corner,” probably < Celtic; compare Latin cant(h)us iron tire (< Celtic), Welsh cant periphery, rim, felloe; probably not akin to Greek kanthós corner of the eye; cf. canteen, cantle, canton

Related forms

cant·ic, adjective

Definition for canter (4 of 4)

cant

3
[ kahnt ]
/ kɑnt /

adjective Scot. and North England.

hearty; merry.

Origin of cant

3
1250–1300; Middle English < Low German kant merry, bold
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for canter

British Dictionary definitions for canter (1 of 4)

canter

/ (ˈkæntə) /

noun

an easy three-beat gait of horses, etc, between a trot and a gallop in speed
at a canter easily; without efforthe won at a canter

verb

to move or cause to move at a canter

Word Origin for canter

C18: short for Canterbury trot, the supposed pace at which pilgrims rode to Canterbury

British Dictionary definitions for canter (2 of 4)

cant

1
/ (kænt) /

noun

insincere talk, esp concerning religion or morals; pious platitudes
stock phrases that have become meaningless through repetition
specialized vocabulary of a particular group, such as thieves, journalists, or lawyers; jargon
singsong whining speech, as used by beggars

verb

(intr) to speak in or use cant

Derived Forms

canter, nouncantingly, adverb

Word Origin for cant

C16: probably via Norman French canter to sing, from Latin cantāre; used disparagingly, from the 12th century, of chanting in religious services

British Dictionary definitions for canter (3 of 4)

cant

2
/ (kænt) /

noun

verb (tr)

adjective

oblique; slanting
having flat surfaces and without curves

Derived Forms

cantic, adjective

Word Origin for cant

C14 (in the sense: edge, corner): perhaps from Latin canthus iron hoop round a wheel, of obscure origin

British Dictionary definitions for canter (4 of 4)

cant

3
/ (kɑːnt) /

adjective

Scot and Northern English dialect lusty; merry; hearty

Word Origin for cant

C14: related to Low German kant bold, merry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012