clement

[klem-uh nt]

adjective

mild or merciful in disposition or character; lenient; compassionate: A clement judge reduced his sentence.
(of the weather) mild or temperate; pleasant.

Nearby words

  1. clemency,
  2. clemens,
  3. clemens, roger,
  4. clemens, samuel l.,
  5. clemens, samuel langhorne,
  6. clement i,
  7. clement i, saint,
  8. clement ii,
  9. clement iii,
  10. clement iv

Origin of clement

1425–75; late Middle English (< Old French) < Latin clēment-, stem of clēmēns gentle, merciful

Related formsclem·ent·ly, adverbo·ver·clem·ent, adjective

Clement

[klem-uh nt]

noun

a male given name.

Clement I

noun

SaintClement of Rome, a.d. c30–c100, first of the Apostolic Fathers: pope 88?–97?

Clement II

noun

Suidger, died 1047, pope 1046–47.

Clement III

noun

Paolo Scolari, died 1191, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1187–91.

Clement IV

noun

Guy Foulques, died 1268, French ecclesiastic: pope 1265–68.

Clement V

noun

Bertrand de Got, 1264–1314, French ecclesiastic: pope 1305–14.

Clement VI

noun

Pierre Roger, 1291–1352, French ecclesiastic: pope 1342–52.

Clement VII

noun

Giulio de' Medici, 1478–1534, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1523–34 (nephew of Lorenzo de' Medici).

Clement VIII

noun

Ippolito Aldobrandini, 1536–1605, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1592–1605.

Clement IX

noun

Giulio Rospigliosi, 1600–69, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1667–69.

Clement X

noun

Emilio Altieri, 1590–1676, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1670–76.

Clement XI

noun

Giovanni Francesco Albani, 1649–1721, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1700–21.

Clement XII

noun

Lorenzo Corsini, 1652–1740, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1730–40.

Clement XIII

noun

Carlo della Torre Rezzonico, 1693–1769, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1758–69.

Clement XIV

noun

Giovanni Vincenzo Antonio GanganelliLorenzo Ganganelli, 1705–74, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1769–74.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for clement


British Dictionary definitions for clement

clement

adjective

merciful
(of the weather) mild
Derived Formsclemently, adverb

Word Origin for clement

C15: from Latin clēmēns mild; probably related to Greek klinein to lean

Clement I

noun

Saint, called Clement of Rome. pope (?88–?97 ad). Feast day: Nov 23

Clement V

noun

original name Bertrand de Got. ?1264–1314, pope (1305–14): removed the papal seat from Rome to Avignon in France (1309)

Clement VII

noun

original name Giulio de' Medici. 1478–1534, pope (1523–34): refused to authorize the annulment of the marriage of Henry VIII of England to Catherine of Aragon (1533)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for clement

clement

adj.

mid-15c., "mild," of persons (attested from early 13c. as a surname), from Old French clement, from Latin clementem (nominative clemens) "mild, placid, gentle" (see clemency). Of weather, 1620s. Taken as a name by several early popes and popular in England as a masculine given name from mid-12c., also in fem. form Clemence.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper