clerical

[ kler-i-kuh l ]
/ ˈklɛr ɪ kəl /

adjective

noun

Origin of clerical

1425–75 for sense “learned”; 1585–95 for def 3; late Middle English < Late Latin clēricālis, equivalent to clēric(us) cleric + -ālis -al1
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for clericals

British Dictionary definitions for clericals (1 of 2)

clericals

/ (ˈklɛrɪkəlz) /

pl n

the distinctive dress of a member of the clergy

British Dictionary definitions for clericals (2 of 2)

clerical

/ (ˈklɛrɪkəl) /

adjective

relating to or associated with the clergyclerical dress
of or relating to office clerks or their worka clerical error
supporting or advocating clericalism
Derived Formsclerically, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for clericals

clerical


adj.

1590s, "pertaining to the clergy," from cleric + -al (1), or from French clérical, from Old French clerigal "learned," from Latin clericalis, from clericus (see cleric). Meaning "pertaining to clerks" is from 1798.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper