Clydesdale

[klahydz-deyl]
noun
  1. one of a Scottish breed of strong, hardy draft horses, having a feathering of long hairs along the backs of the legs.

Origin of Clydesdale

First recorded in 1780–90; after Clydesdale, Scotland
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

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British Dictionary definitions for clydesdale

Clydesdale

noun
  1. a heavy powerful breed of carthorse, originally from Scotland
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for clydesdale

Clydesdale

"breed of heavy draught horses," 1786, so called because they were bred in the valley of the Clyde in Scotland. The river name is perhaps literally "cleansing," from a Celtic root akin to Latin cloaca (see cloaca).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper