coopt

or co-opt

[koh-opt]
See more synonyms for coopt on Thesaurus.com
verb (used with object)
  1. to elect into a body by the votes of the existing members.
  2. to assimilate, take, or win over into a larger or established group: The fledgling Labor party was coopted by the Socialist party.
  3. to appropriate as one's own; preempt: The dissidents have coopted the title of her novel for their slogan.

Origin of coopt

From the Latin word cooptāre, dating back to 1645–55. See co-, opt
Related formsco·op·ta·tion, co-op·ta·tion, co·op·tion, co-op·tion [koh-op-shuh n] /koʊˈɒp ʃən/, nounco·op·ta·tive, co-op·ta·tive [koh-op-tuh-tiv] /koʊˈɒp tə tɪv/, co·op·tive, co-op·tive, adjective
Can be confusedco-op coop co-opt coupe
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for co-opt

Contemporary Examples of co-opt

Historical Examples of co-opt

  • "I wish we could co-opt some biologists and psychologists into this," murmured Rakkan.

    Security

    Poul William Anderson

  • Then someone has said, "We must co-opt Mr. Raymond Stornaway."

    Sonia Married

    Stephen McKenna

  • Of course they "co-opt" their fellow politicians, rejected candidates, and so on.

  • When the persons elected met they had no choice but to co-opt the 104 from the Left of the Convention.

  • The law did indeed provide that the corporations should co-opt at least one woman on their education boards.

    My Own Story

    Emmeline Pankhurst


British Dictionary definitions for co-opt

coopt

co-opt

verb (tr)
  1. to add (someone) to a committee, board, etc, by the agreement of the existing members
  2. to appoint summarily; commandeer
Derived Formscooption, co-option, cooptation or co-optation, nouncooptative or co-optative, adjective

Word Origin for coopt

C17: from Latin cooptāre to elect, from optāre to choose
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for co-opt
v.

1650s, "to select (someone) for a group or club by a vote of members," from Latin cooptare "to elect, to choose as a colleague or member of one's tribe," from com- "together" (see com-) + optare "choose" (see option (n.)). For some reason this defied the usual pattern of Latin-to-English adaptation, which should have yielded *cooptate. Sense of "take over" is first recorded c.1953. Related: Co-opted; co-opting.

coopt

v.

see co-opt.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper