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cognizance

or cog·ni·sance

[ kog-nuh-zuhns, kon-uh- ]
/ ˈkɒg nə zəns, ˈkɒn ə- /
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See synonyms for: cognizance / cognizances on Thesaurus.com

noun
awareness, realization, or knowledge; notice; perception: The guests took cognizance of the snide remark.
Law.
  1. judicial notice as taken by a court in dealing with a cause.
  2. the right of taking jurisdiction, as possessed by a court.
  3. acknowledgment; admission, as a plea admitting the fact alleged in the declaration.
the range or scope of knowledge, observation, etc.: Such understanding is beyond his cognizance.
Heraldry. a device by which a person or a person's servants or property can be recognized; badge.
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Origin of cognizance

1250–1300; Middle English conisa(u)nce<Middle French con(o)is(s)ance, equivalent to conois(tre) to know (<Latin cognōscere;see cognition) + -ance-ance; forms with -g- (<Latin ) from the 16th century

OTHER WORDS FROM cognizance

non·cog·ni·zance, nounself-cog·ni·zance, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use cognizance in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for cognizance

cognizance

cognisance

/ (ˈkɒɡnɪzəns, ˈkɒnɪ-) /

noun
knowledge; acknowledgment
take cognizance of to take notice of; acknowledge, esp officially
the range or scope of knowledge or perception
law
  1. the right of a court to hear and determine a cause or matter
  2. knowledge of certain facts upon which the court must act without requiring proof
  3. mainly US confession
heraldry a distinguishing badge or bearing

Word Origin for cognizance

C14: from Old French conoissance, from conoistre to know, from Latin cognōscere to learn; see cognition
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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