collar

[kol-er]
||

noun

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

Metalworking. (of a piece being rolled) to wrap itself around a roller.

Idioms

    hot under the collar, Informal. angry; excited; upset.

Origin of collar

1250–1300; Middle English coler < Anglo-French; Old French colier < Latin collāre neckband, collar, equivalent to coll(um) neck + -āre, neuter (as noun) of -āris -ar1; spelling later conformed to Latin (cf. -ar2)
Related formscol·lar·less, adjectiveun·col·lar, verb (used with object)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for collarless

Contemporary Examples of collarless

Historical Examples of collarless

  • He was collarless, and she was a good deal "put to it" to supply the lack.

    Peak and Prairie

    Anna Fuller

  • Tobacco juice stained the front of his stiff-bosomed, collarless shirt.

    Free Air

    Sinclair Lewis

  • Collared or collarless, Bill is always ready to lend a helping bark.

    Anecdotes of Dogs

    Edward Jesse

  • Every gentleman in the room was collarless, coatless, tieless, and vestless.

    The Crisis, Complete

    Winston Churchill

  • He was collarless and hatless, his linen was dirty, and there was blood upon his hands.


British Dictionary definitions for collarless

collar

noun

the part of a garment around the neck and shoulders, often detachable or folded over
any band, necklace, garland, etc, encircling the necka collar of flowers
a band or chain of leather, rope, or metal placed around an animal's neck to restrain, harness, or identify it
biology a marking or structure resembling a collar, such as that found around the necks of some birds or at the junction of a stem and a root
a section of a shaft or rod having a locally increased diameter to provide a bearing seat or a locating ring
a cut of meat, esp bacon, taken from around the neck of an animal
hot under the collar informal aroused with anger, annoyance, etc

verb (tr)

to put a collar on; furnish with a collar
to seize by the collar
informal to seize; arrest; detain

Word Origin for collar

C13: from Latin collāre neckband, neck chain, collar, from collum neck
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for collarless

collar

n.

c.1300, "neck armor, gorget," from Old French coler "neck, collar" (12c., Modern French collier), from Latin collare "necklace, band or chain for the neck," from collum "the neck," from PIE *kwol-o- "neck" (cf. Old Norse and Middle Dutch hals "neck"), literally "that on which the head turns," from root *kwel- "move round, turn about" (see cycle (n.)). Late 14c. as "border at the neck of a garment."

collar

v.

1550s, "to grab (someone) by the collar or neck," from collar (n.). Meaning "to capture" is attested from 1610s. Related: Collared; collaring. As a past participle adjective, collared "wearing a collar" is from late 14c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with collarless

collar

see hot under the collar.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.