collation

[ kuh-ley-shuh n, koh-, ko- ]
/ kəˈleɪ ʃən, koʊ-, kɒ- /

noun

the act of collating.
Bibliography. the verification of the number and order of the leaves and signatures of a volume.
a light meal that may be permitted on days of general fast.
any light meal.
(in a monastery) the practice of reading and conversing on the lives of the saints or the Scriptures at the close of the day.
the presentation of a member of the clergy to a benefice, especially by a bishop who is the patron or has acquired the patron's rights.

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Origin of collation

1175–1225; Middle English collacion (< Anglo-French) < Medieval Latin collāciōn-, collātiōn- (stem of collātiō), equivalent to Latin collāt(us) (see collate) + -iōn- -ion
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for collation

British Dictionary definitions for collation

collation
/ (kɒˈleɪʃən, kə-) /

noun

the act or process of collating
a description of the technical features of a book
RC Church a light meal permitted on fast days
any light informal meal
the appointment of a clergyman to a benefice
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012