coopt

or co-opt

[ koh-opt ]
/ koʊˈɒpt /

verb (used with object)

to elect into a body by the votes of the existing members.
to assimilate, take, or win over into a larger or established group: The fledgling Labor party was coopted by the Socialist party.
to appropriate as one's own; preempt: The dissidents have coopted the title of her novel for their slogan.

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Origin of coopt

From the Latin word cooptāre, dating back to 1645–55. See co-, opt

OTHER WORDS FROM coopt

co·op·ta·tion, co-op·ta·tion, co·op·tion, co-op·tion [koh-op-shuh n] /koʊˈɒp ʃən/, nounco·op·ta·tive, co-op·ta·tive [koh-op-tuh-tiv] /koʊˈɒp tə tɪv/, co·op·tive, co-op·tive, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH coopt

co-op coop co-opt coupe
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for coopt

British Dictionary definitions for coopt

coopt

co-opt

/ (kəʊˈɒpt) /

verb (tr)

to add (someone) to a committee, board, etc, by the agreement of the existing members
to appoint summarily; commandeer

Derived forms of coopt

cooption, co-option, cooptation or co-optation, nouncooptative or co-optative, adjective

Word Origin for coopt

C17: from Latin cooptāre to elect, from optāre to choose
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012