corny

1
[ kawr-nee ]
/ ˈkɔr ni /
||

adjective, corn·i·er, corn·i·est.

of or abounding in corn.
Informal.
  1. old-fashioned, trite, or lacking in subtlety: corny jokes.
  2. mawkishly sentimental: a corny soap opera.

Nearby words

  1. cornwall,
  2. cornwallis,
  3. cornwallis, charles,
  4. cornwell,
  5. cornwell, david john moore,
  6. coro,
  7. coro-,
  8. corody,
  9. coroll.,
  10. corolla

Origin of corny

1
1350–1400; 1930–35 for def 2; Middle English; see corn1, -y1

SYNONYMS FOR corny
Related formscorn·i·ly, adverbcorn·i·ness, noun

corny

2
[ kawr-nee ]
/ ˈkɔr ni /

adjective, corn·i·er, corn·i·est.

pertaining to or affected with corns of the feet.

Origin of corny

2
First recorded in 1700–10; corn2 + -y1

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for corniest



British Dictionary definitions for corniest

corny

/ (ˈkɔːnɪ) /

adjective cornier or corniest slang

trite or banal
sentimental or mawkish
abounding in corn

Word Origin for corny

C16 (C20 in the sense rustic, banal): from corn 1 + -y 1

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for corniest

corny

adj.

1570s, "full of corn, pertaining to corn, from corn (n.1) + -y (2). Chaucer used it of ale (late 14c.), perhaps to mean "malty." American English slang "old-fashioned, sentimental" is from 1932 (first attested in "Melody Maker"), perhaps originally "something appealing to country folk" (corn-fed in the same sense is attested from 1929). Related: Cornily; corniness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper