corruptible

[kuh-ruhp-tuh-buh l]
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adjective

that can or might be corrupted.

Origin of corruptible

1300–50; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin corruptibilis < Latin corrupt(us) (see corrupt) + -ibilis -ible
Related formscor·rupt·i·bil·i·ty, cor·rupt·i·ble·ness, nouncor·rupt·i·bly, adverbnon·cor·rupt·i·bil·i·ty, nounnon·cor·rupt·i·ble, adjectivenon·cor·rupt·i·ble·ness, nounnon·cor·rupt·i·bly, adverbun·cor·rupt·i·ble, adjectiveun·cor·rupt·i·ble·ness, nounun·cor·rupt·i·bly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for corruptibility

Historical Examples of corruptibility

  • No; weakness, corruptibility even, would then excite no harsher feeling than a sort of amused contempt.

    Gulmore, The Boss

    Frank Harris

  • What protection did they provide for the country against the corruptibility of members of Congress?

  • Then the symptoms of corruptibility soon made their appearance.

    Notes on the book of Exodus

    C. H. (Charles Henry) Mackintosh


British Dictionary definitions for corruptibility

corruptible

adjective

susceptible to corruption; capable of being corrupted
Derived Formscorruptibility or corruptibleness, nouncorruptibly, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for corruptibility

corruptible

adj.

mid-14c., of material things, from Old French corroptible (14c.), from Late Latin corruptibilis "liable to decay, corruptible," from past participle stem of corrumpere (see corrupt). Of persons, from 1670s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper